Materials and Corrosion in the Oil and Gas Industry – Review Article (Trends in Research and Development)

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Great open access review article by

  • Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi (Curtin University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Australia),
  • Prof. Afrooz Barnoush (Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norway) and
  • Prof. Roy Johnsen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norway)

in npj Materials Degradation about corrosion and materials challenges in offshore and subsea oil and gas production.

M. Iannuzzi, A. Barnoush, R. Johnsen, Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production, npj Materials Degradation, 1 (2017) 1-11. doi: 10.1038/s41529–017–0003–4

oil-and-gas-industry

Abstract

The ever-growing energy demand requires the exploration and the safe, profitable exploitation of unconventional reserves. The extreme environments of some of these unique prospects challenge the boundaries of traditional engineering alloys, as well as our understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms that could lead to a failure. Despite their complexity, high-pressure and high-temperature, deep and ultra-deep, pre-salt, and Arctic reservoirs represent the most important source of innovation regarding materials technology, design methodologies, and corrosion control strategies. This paper provides an overview of trends in materials and corrosion research and development, with focus on subsea production but applicable to the entire industry. Emphasis is given to environmentally assisted cracking of high strength alloys and advanced characterization techniques based on in situ electrochemical nanoindentation and cantilever bending testing for the study of microstructure-environment interactions.

For more details about this review article please check post titled:

Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production – Publication

on About Corrosion blog by Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi.


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Microcantilever geometry and dimensions – Fig 7 from M. Iannuzzi, A. Barnoush, R. Johnsen, Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production, npj Materials Degradation, 1 (2017) 1-11. doi: 10.1038/s41529–017–0003–4

The article has been published as OpenAccess, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

About Corrosion blog by Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi.

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This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

 

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Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic on ICF14 Conference, Greece, 2017

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The 14th International Conference on Fracture (ICF14), Rhodes, Greece, June 18-23, 2017, main focus was in all aspects of structural integrity with the objective of improving the safety and performance of engineering structures, components, systems and their associated materials. ICF14 included two main tracks devoted to failure analysis of engineering materials and structures, and nanomaterials and nanostructures (MEMS and NEMS). ICF14 included invited lectures by eminent academics from around the world together with contributed oral and poster presentations covering all aspect of fracture and fatigue. During the conference Special Symposia covering major areas of research activity organized by members of the Scientific Advisory Board take place.

I presented a paper titled:

A STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY MODEL FOR HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF LOW CARBON STEEL AND THE COMBINED EFFECT OF HELP AND HEDE MECHANISMS ON MACROMECHANICAL PROPERTIES

By: Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Bratislav Rajicic, Aleksandar Sedmak, Radivoje Mitrovic and Zarko Miskovic

University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Serbia

at the ICF14, within the Special Symposium titled:

“Fatigue and fracture in aggressive environments: mechanisms and risk
assessment” – Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic (click on the link for Special Symposium program),

organized by Prof. Robert Akid, Prof. Ihor Dmytrakh and me (Prof. Milos B. Djukic) – members of the ICF14 Scientific Committee.

A Special Symposium – “Fatigue and fracture in aggressive environments: mechanisms and risk
assessment” was also listed on ICF14 website  within Special Symposia/Sessions section (No. 1 on the list).

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All papers (15) presented at the Special Symposium“Fatigue and fracture in aggressive environments: mechanisms and risk
assessment” with hyperlinks  – abstracts (click on the title):

  1. Modelling The Early Stages Of Corrosion Fatigue,
    Robert Akid
  2. Implications Of Hydride-induced Embrittlement On Structural Integrity Analysis,
    ANDREAS VARIAS
  3. Hotpits: The Darwin Approach To Assessing Risk Of Hot Corrosion-induced Fracture In Gas Turbine Components,
    Kwai Chan, Michael Enright, Jonathan Moody, Colin Thomas, Andrew Fast
  4. Fracture Assessment Of Hydrogen Assisted Cracking In Nickel Alloys Using Fracture Surface Topography Analysis (frasta),
    Dhinakaran Sampath, Robert Akid
  5. Mitigation Of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking In Al-mg By Electrochemical Potential Control,
    Matthew McMahon, John Scully, James Burns
  6. A Structural Integrity Model For Hydrogen Embrittlement Of Low Carbon Steel And The Combined Effect Of Help And Hede Mechanisms On Macromechanical Properties,
    Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Bratislav Rajicic, Aleksandar Sedmak, Radivoje Mitrovic, Zarko Miskovic
  7. A Phase Field Method For Modeling Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation Induced By Anodic Dissolution,
    Thanh Tung Nguyen, Julien Rethore, Marie-Christine BAIETTO , Jose Bolivar, Marion Fregonese
  8. Effect Of Nickel In Solid Solution On The Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility Of Low Alloy Steels,
    Hans Husby
  9. Mechanistic Studies Of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking Under Atmospheric Exposure Conditions,
    Patrick Steiner, James Burns
  10. Fatigue Crack Resistance Of Modern Materials For Turbogenerators & Gas Turbine In High Pressure And High Temperature Hydrogen,
    Alexander Balitskii
  11. Understanding The Mechanical Behaviour Of 718 And 625+ Nickel Base Superalloys Under Cathodic Protection,
    David Martelo Guarin, Anthony Cook, Robert Akid
  12. A Mechanistic Framework For Hydrogen Embrittlement,
    Emilio Martinez-Paneda, Susana del Busto, Covadonga Betegon
  13. Decohesion Laws For Predicting Hydrogen-induced Crack Growth In Ti-alloys,
    Kwai Chan
  14. Hydrogen Embrittlement Of Welded Joints Of Tram Rails In Aggressive Environments,
    Michal Kawiak, Aleksander Balitski
  15. The Operated Steel Degradation Peculiarities Of The Different Elements Of Power Steam Pipelines,
    Oleksandra Student, Halyna Krechkovska, Hryhoriy Nykyforchyn, Olha Zvirko

Other interesting papers related to the hydrogen embrittlement topic presented at the ICF14:

20170622_174338

With Prof. Emmanuel E. Gdoutos, ICF14 Executive Chairman

20170620_092441

With Prof. Zhiliang Zhang, Norwegian University of Science and Technology


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Our recent article (2015):

Hydrogen Damage of Steels: A Case Study and Hydrogen Embrittlement Model

M.B. Djukic, V. Sijacki Zeravcic, G.M. Bakic, A. Sedmak, B. Rajicic, Hydrogen damage of steels: A case study and hydrogen embrittlement model, Engineering Failure Analysis, 2015, Volume 58, Part 2, pp. 485–498

About model of simultaneous action of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms (HELP+HEDE) in steel and their effects on Mechanical Properties

Please check this post.

Paper – Link at Elsevier (click on text)

Paper – Link (free download ) at ResearchGate (click on text)


Our recent article (2016):

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention and Model

Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Aleksandar Sedmak, and Bratislav Rajicic, Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention, and Models. CORROSION. 2016; 72(7): 943-961., http://dx.doi.org/10.5006/1958

A background for the analysis of the viable hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms: hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) in a ferritic-pearlitic carbon steel and development of a model for structural integrity analysis is a literature overview about the current state of the art in hydrogen embrittlement modeling and studies (140 References), presented in this paper.

Please check this post.

Article – Link at NACE website (click on text)

Article – Link (Free Download) at ResearchGate (click on text)



This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

 

Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic on DSL2017 Conference, Vienna, 2017

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The 13th International Conference on Diffusion in Solids and Liquids, DSL 2017 has as its aim to create a binding platform for scientists, researchers, those in industry, laboratories, as well as students, to network, learn and share their knowledge. Furthermore, it will provide new insights in overcoming the current challenges which are faced by academics and industrialists related to diffusion in its many areas.

I presented an Invited Talk – paper titled:

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT IN LOW CARBON STEEL AND THE SYNERGISTIC INTERPLAY OF THE HELP AND HEDE MECHANISMS

in a Special Session on HYDROGEN-RELATED KINETICS IN MATERIALS (SS10), Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic (DSL-2017-Hydrogen Session -flayer)

of the DSL 2017 confererence

which was held in VIENNA (Austria) from 26-30 June, 2017.

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Other papers – Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic:

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Our recent article (2015):

Hydrogen Damage of Steels: A Case Study and Hydrogen Embrittlement Model

M.B. Djukic, V. Sijacki Zeravcic, G.M. Bakic, A. Sedmak, B. Rajicic, Hydrogen damage of steels: A case study and hydrogen embrittlement model, Engineering Failure Analysis, 2015, Volume 58, Part 2, pp. 485–498

About model of simultaneous action of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms (HELP+HEDE) in steel and their effects on Mechanical Properties

Please check this post.

Paper – Link at Elsevier (click on text)

Paper – Link (free download ) at ResearchGate (click on text)


Our recent article (2016):

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention and Model

Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Aleksandar Sedmak, and Bratislav Rajicic, Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention, and Models. CORROSION. 2016; 72(7): 943-961., http://dx.doi.org/10.5006/1958

A background for the analysis of the viable hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms: hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) in a ferritic-pearlitic carbon steel and development of a model for structural integrity analysis is a literature overview about the current state of the art in hydrogen embrittlement modeling and studies (140 References), presented in this paper.

Please check this post.

Article – Link at NACE website (click on text)

Article – Link (Free Download) at ResearchGate (click on text)

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3

2




This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Combined Effect of Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms (HELP+HEDE) on Mechanical Properties of Low Carbon Steels, ICF14 – Paper

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This paper I will present at the upcoming 14th International Conference on Fracture (ICF14), Rhodes, Greece, June 18-23, 2017, within the special symposium titled:

“Fatigue and fracture in aggressive environments: mechanisms and risk
assessment” – Hydrogen Embrittlement Topic (click on the link for Special Symposium Announcement), organized by Prof. Robert Akid, Prof. Ihor Dmytrakh and me (Prof. Milos B. Djukic)

A STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY MODEL FOR HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF LOW CARBON STEEL AND THE COMBINED EFFECT OF HELP AND HEDE MECHANISMS ON MACROMECHANICAL PROPERTIES

By: Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Bratislav Rajicic, Aleksandar Sedmak, Radivoje Mitrovic and Zarko Miskovic

University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Serbia

Special Sumposium was also listed on ICF14 website  within Special Symposia/Sessions section (No. 1 on the list).

Abstract

A large number of contemporary studies about hydrogen embrittlement confirmed the multiple effects of hydrogen and activity of the different hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms in low carbon steels. However, critical evaluation and quantification of the synergy between the hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) and decohesion-based (HEDE) mechanisms, and their combined effect on macromechanical properties, still does not exist. This paper focuses on a structural integrity models for hydrogen embrittlement of low carbon St.20 (AISI 1020) steel in the presence of simultaneously active hydrogen embrittlement micro-mechanisms.

All text Copyright © 2016 by Milos Djukic – All Rights Reserved

ICF14

Our recent article (2015):

Hydrogen Damage of Steels: A Case Study and Hydrogen Embrittlement Model

M.B. Djukic, V. Sijacki Zeravcic, G.M. Bakic, A. Sedmak, B. Rajicic, Hydrogen damage of steels: A case study and hydrogen embrittlement model, Engineering Failure Analysis, 2015, Volume 58, Part 2, pp. 485–498

About model of simultaneous action of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms (HELP+HEDE) in steel and their effects on Mechanical Properties

Please check this post.

Paper – Link at Elsevier (click on text)

Paper – Link (free download ) at ResearchGate (click on text)

wwwww

The most downloaded articles from Engineering Failure Analysis in the last 90 days.

hydrogen

Our recent article (2016):

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention and Model

Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Aleksandar Sedmak, and Bratislav Rajicic, Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention, and Models. CORROSION. 2016; 72(7): 943-961., http://dx.doi.org/10.5006/1958

A background for the analysis of the viable hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms: hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) in a ferritic-pearlitic carbon steel and development of a model for structural integrity analysis is a literature overview about the current state of the art in hydrogen embrittlement modeling and studies (140 References), presented in this paper.

Please check this post.

Article – Link at NACE website (click on text)

Article – Link (Free Download) at ResearchGate (click on text)

SLIKA



This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Project: Materials and Corrosion Trends in Offshore and Subsea Oil and Gas Production – Open Science Framework (OSF)

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Materials and Corrosion Trends in Offshore and Subsea Oil and Gas Production

For more information about the project, see the project webpage.

Project on Open Science Framework (OSF) by:

  1. Mariano Iannuzzi, Adjunct Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Principal Engineer, General Electric – Oil & Gas
  2. Afrooz BarnoushProfessor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
  3. Roy JohnsenProfessor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Norwegian University of Science and Technology -NTNU

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

ntnu_engelsk_rgb

Project description: The ever-growing energy demand requires the exploration and the safe, profitable exploitation of unconventional reserves. The extreme environments of some of these unique prospects challenge the boundaries of traditional engineering alloys as well as our understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms that could lead to a failure. Despite their complexity, high-pressure and high-temperature, deep- and ultra-deep, pre-salt, and Arctic reservoirs represent the most important source of innovation regarding materials technology, design methodologies, and corrosion control strategies.

Here is a preprint of the latest manuscript by Mariano IannuzziAfrooz Barnoush and Roy Johnsen, which is currently accepted for publication and in press in the upcoming Nature Materials Degradation journal:

Iannuzzi, Mariano, Afrooz Barnoush, and Roy Johnsen. 2017. “Materials and Corrosion Trends in Offshore and Subsea Oil and Gas Production”. engrXiv. April 28. osf.io/preprints/engrxiv/qj65n.

NTNU logo in this post, Copyrights by NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, all rights reserved © 2017


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

https://milosdjukichydrogen.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/network21.jpg

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of hydrogen degradation of engineering materials and their co-evolution with science, materials science, industry and society, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Synergistic Interplay of the HELP and HEDE Mechanisms of Hydrogen Embrittlement in Steels, Invited talk at DSL 2017 Conference

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An invited talk – paper titled:

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT IN LOW CARBON STEEL AND THE SYNERGISTIC INTERPLAY OF THE HELP AND HEDE MECHANISMS

Prof. Milos B. Djukic, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Enginnering, Serbia

will be presented in a Special Session on HYDROGEN-RELATED KINETICS IN MATERIALS (SS10), DSL-2017-Hydrogen Session -flayer free to download

of the

13th International Conference on Diffusion in Solids and Liquids, DSL 2017 

which will be held in VIENNA (Austria) from 26-30 June, 2017.

Abstract of invited talk:

The simultaneous activity and synergistic interplay of the hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) and hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement (HELP+HEDE) was fully confirmed for the first time in low cartbon grade 20 – St.20 (or 20G, equivalent to AISI 1020) steel specimens in situ charged with hydrogen, and not only through simulation and modeling [1,2].

The activity of a particular hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanism depends on the local concentration of hydrogen in investigated steel. The HELP+HEDE model of HE in low carbon steels is based on the correlation of mechanical properties to scanning electron microscopy fractography analysis of fracture surfaces in the presence of simultaneously active hydrogen embrittlement micro-mechanisms [1]. The effects and correlations between microstructure, fractographic observations, and macro-mechanical testing data (tensile testing, impact strength and hardness) are also considered.

This paper also gives an overview of the application of a model for structural integrity analysis of boiler tubes made of low carbon steel exposed during operation to a local corrosion process and multiple hydrogen assisted degradation processes: HE mechanisms (HELP+HEDE) and high-temperature hydrogen attack [2].

[1] M.B. Djukic, V. Sijacki Zeravcic, G.M. Bakic, A. Sedmak, B. Rajicic, Hydrogen damage of steels: A case study and hydrogen embrittlement model, Engineering Failure Analysis, 58 (2015), pp. 485-498, doi: 10.1016/j.engfailanal.2015.05.017

[2] M.B. Djukic, G.M. Bakic, V. Sijacki Zeravcic, A. Sedmak, B. Rajicic, Hydrogen embrittlement of industrial components: prediction, prevention, and models, Corrosion, 72 (2016), pp. 943961, doi: 10.5006/1958

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About Special Session 10
HYDROGEN-RELATED KINETICS IN MATERIALS (SS10)

Organiser:

Prof. Markus Wilde
Institute of Industrial Science,
The University of Tokyo
Japan
wilde@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Continued annually since DSL-2010. This session discusses broad aspects of hydrogen (H)-related kinetics and H-induced phenomena in materials from a fundamental viewpoint. The aim is to obtain a deeper understanding of dynamical processes such as the atomic-level mechanisms of the reversible hydrogen transportation across the gas/solid interface relevant to hydrogen (hydride) storage, hydrogen purification by permeation, hydrogen isotope retention in plasma-facing materials, and hydrogenation catalysis. Emphasis is also placed on interactions of hydrogen with the micro- or defect structure in the volume of (nano-)materials that can induce drastic physical (mechanical or electrical) property changes but still lack adequate explanations.

In addition to welcoming all subject below, special highlights of the 2017 Session are direct detection techniques for hydrogen (diffusion) dynamics as well as hydrogen-induced electronic effects in semiconductor devices.  Both experimentalists and theoreticians are strongly encouraged to participate.

Topics of the special session include:

  • H-diffusion (surface and bulk)
  • H in nanoparticles and thin films
  • Hydrogenation catalysis
  • Hydrogen permeation
  • Electrochemistry, Fuel cell catalysis
  • H-defect interactions
  • H-induced vacancy formation and diffusion
  • H-embrittlement
  • H impact on the tribology of surfaces

Special Session on HYDROGEN-RELATED KINETICS IN MATERIALS (SS10),

Introductory talk:
‘HYDROGEN TRANSPORTATION MECHANISM ACROSS METAL SURFACES REVEALED THROUGH THERMAL DESORPTION AND NUCLEAR REACTION ANALYSIS – FROM HYDROGEN ABSORPTION TO HYDROGENATION CATALYSIS´ – Prof. Markus Wilde, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Other invited speakers:

  • ‘HYDROGEN DISTRIBUTION IN NANO-SIZED METALS: HYDROGEN MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUES’ – Prof. Astrid Pundt, Universität Göttingen, Germany
  • ‘HYDROGEN-RELATED RELIABILITY ISSUES IN ELECTRONIC DEVICES’ – Prof. Tibor Grasser, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
  • ‘A COMPREHENSIVE PICTURE OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE SURFACE AND THE BURIED INTERFACE IN SI FILM MATERIALS FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF HYDROGEN DIFFUSION’ – Dr. Ziyuan Liu, RIKEN, Japan
  • ‘THERMAL AND NEUTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON HYDROGEN ABSORPTION/DESORPTION PROCESSES IN METAL NANOPARTICLES’ – Dr. Hiroshi Akiba, The University of Tokyo, Japan

 

dsl1


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Special Issue “Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Advanced High Strength Alloys” of Metals journal

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Special Issue of Metals journal“Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Advanced High Strength Alloys”

Guest Editor:

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Metals (ISSN 2075-4701) is an open access journal of related scientific research and technology development. It publishes reviews, regular research papers (articles) and short communications. Metals provides a forum for publishing papers which advance the in-depth understanding of the relationship between the structure, the properties or the functions of all kinds of metals.

Special Issue Information:

See original invoce by Prof. Dr. Afrooz Barnoush on Corrosion blog by Dr. Mariano Iannuzzi, Adjunct Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and  Principal Engineer, General Electric – Oil & Gas

Dear Colleagues,

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC), an intricate interaction between the environment, stress state, and material, results in brittle fracture of otherwise ductile materials. EAC covers a broad range of failure in materials, such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue, hydrogen embrittlement, sulfide stress cracking, hydrogen enhanced fatigue, irradiation induced SCC, to name a few. All different forms of EAC have been studied extensively, and, for a relatively long time, generating a vast body of knowledge.

We are presently experiencing the complete transformation of the alloy development and manufacturing cycles, which are transitioning from the traditional trial-and-error approach to a new knowledge-based methodology. Thus, the scientific and engineering communities require a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in EAC-related phenomena. Likewise, new processing techniques, like additive manufacturing, are becoming mainstream. The new manufacturing methods could lead to alloys with entirely different microstructures and compositional variations and, consequently, unknown EAC behavior.

At the same time, the ever-growing demand of the energy, automotive, and aerospace sectors has fueled the development of new high strength alloys with complex microstructures and chemistries, prone to EAC.

The examples above boldly illustrate the necessity of interdisciplinary and multiscale research to increase the understanding of the mechanisms leading to environmental cracking in high-performing alloys. Modern techniques and approaches, including in situ testing and high-resolution analysis and characterization tools, provide an entirely new perspective for the examination pf the various forms of EAC.

We are planning a Special Issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701), an Open Access metallurgy journal, on the latest research on EAC of advanced alloys. We kindly invite all members of the materials and corrosion communities to submit their best work for consideration in this special issue. The deadline for manuscript submissions is 31 December, 2017. For more information and for manuscript submission details please visit the EAC special issue home page or contact me.

Prof. Dr. Afrooz Barnoush
Guest Editor


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

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The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Your Essential ‘How-to’ Guide to Choosing Article Titles

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Post on MARCOMMUNIQUE – Marketing and Communication for Education and Science Blog by Kirk Englehardt. This article has been republished from the Impact on Social Sciences blog (June 21st, 2011).

MARCOMMUNIQUE

This article has been republished from the Impact on Social Sciences blog.

One of the key tasks for an article author who wants to be cited is to quickly persuade people to click on the title of their piece and learn more from the abstract or book outline and then from there to persuade them to download the whole article. Here we present a simple ‘how-to’ guide to choosing article titles.

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Characterization of Tube Repair Weld Made of X20CrMoV121 (12Cr) Martensite Ferritic Steel

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Chapter in book “Fracture at all Scale” (2017):

 

Gordana M. Bakic, Milos B. Djukic, Bratislav Rajicic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Aleksandar Maslarevic, Miladin Radovic, Vesna Maksimovic, Nenad Milosevic, Characterization of Tube Repair Weld in Thermal Power Plant Made of a 12%Cr Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steel, In book: Fracture at all Scales, Edition: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering (LNME), Editors: Guy Pluvinage, Ljubica Milovic, Springer International Publishing (2017), pp. 151-169, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-32634-4_8

Book chapter – Link at Springer website (click on text)

Book chapter – Link (Free Download) at ResearchGate (click on text)

Abstract

The heat resistant tempered martensite ferritic steel X20CrMoV121 (DIN) has been extensively used within the last few decades as a material for boiler tubing systems and pipelines in thermal power plants (TPP). Long-term behavior of this steel is vastly researched and very well known, but main disadvantage is its poor weldability. In situ welding of martensitic steels is always challenging task and is usually quite difficult to implement properly in a short time, during forced outages of TPP. In this paper, characterization and mechanical properties of undermatch welded joint made during partial replacement of boiler outlet superheater (SH) in TPP by austenitic filler material, after 10 years of service are presented. Due to “cold” technique of welding, which does not required post weld heat treatment, this procedure were regular and widely used repair welding technique in two TPP (620 MW) units. In the purpose of comparison, two other type of matching welding joints of the same SH were also characterized: shop welded joint made by electrical resistance flash butt welding, as well as field welded joint made by gas tungsten arc welding during assembling of SH, which were both in service approximately 150,000 h.


cover

Fracture at all Scales

Editors: Pluvinage, Guy, Milovic, Ljubica (Eds.)

Book information

This book is a compilation of selected papers from the 2014 New Trends in Fatigue and Fracture (NT2F14) Conference, which was held in Belgrade, Serbia. This prestigious conference brought together delegates from around the globe to discuss how to characterize, predict and analyze the fatigue and fracture of engineering materials, components, and structures using theoretical, experimental, numerical and practical approaches.

It highlights some important new trends in fracture mechanics presented at the conference, such as:

•   two-parameter fracture mechanics, arising from the coupling of fracture toughness and stress constraints

•   high-performance steel for gas and oil transportation and production (pressure vessels and boilers)

•   safety and reliability of welded joints

This book includes 12 contributions from well-known international scientists and a special tribute dedicated to the scientific contributions of Stojan Sedmark, who passed away in 2014.

Copyright © 2017 Springer International Publishing Switzerland


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

What is Materials Science and Why Do I Like it?

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Post on DecentMatSci Blog.

The Materialist

According to the internet Materials Science is ‘the scientific study of the properties and applications of materials of construction or manufacture (as ceramics, metals, polymers, and composites)‘ I like to think of it as how something is made and what it does and why.

The reason I have applied to university for materials science is that its all around us and I think that advancements have been and will be crucial to humanities progress. A simple change of a certain molecular bond can entirely change how a material behaves and this is fascinating.

Why does elastic stretch? Why are diamonds hard? How do solar panels work? These questions and many, many more would go unanswered by many people but materials scientists know the answers.

There are many examples of why materials science is amazing, or atleast decent in a lot of cases. I want to share these here…

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Hydrogen embrittlement of INCOLOY aloy 945X (UNS N09945)

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Paper:

Demetriou V., Robson J.D., Preuss M., Morana R.: Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Alloy 945X (UNS N09945) and Influence of Microstructural Features, Materials Science and Engineering: A, Vol. 684, 2017, pp. 423-434

Abstract

This study investigated the hydrogen embrittlement sensitivity of the precipitation hardened (PH) alloy 945X in three different metallurgical states. The three variants examined (obtained by different heat treatments) were the standard oil and gas industry condition, and two alternative microstructures with variations in fraction and morphology of γ′, γ″ and δ phases. For each metallurgical state, mechanical tests were carried out on both uncharged and hydrogen pre-charged specimens in order to evaluate the deleterious influence of hydrogen on mechanical properties. Material characterisation and post-test fractography was performed to understand the link between microstructural features, fracture behaviour, and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Fractographic analysis showed that, in the presence of hydrogen, intergranular fracture occurred for all the heat treatments, regardless the presence of δ-phase at grain boundaries. There was no simple correlation between the volume fraction of δ-phase and susceptibility to hydrogen assisted embrittlement. Rather, it was demonstrated that the morphology and distribution of δ-phase along grain boundaries plays a key role and the other precipitate phases also have an influence through their influence on the ease of strain localization.

Paper – Link at Elsevier, free to download for 6 weeks (click on text)

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier. All rights reserved.


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

Image

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Serbian NoE and Research Framework in Materials Characterization – Hydrogen Embrittlement

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I was invited by Prof. Branislav Todorovic, President of Organizing Committee to give a presentation at the 47th International Congress & Exhibition on Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, which was held in Belgrade, Serbia, 30 November – 2 December.

The title of the lecture was

“Serbian Network of Excellence and Research Framework in Materials Characterization”

This lecture was presented within special Forum titled: Towards 5 Continents Cooperation – Science, Research & Development, Standardization, Certification, Education Engineering & Manufacturing (KGH-SMEITS & ECS, UNEP, UNDP, IIR, ASHRAE-Danube, REHVA, IBPSA-Danube, ABOK, Chinese and Australian Engineers).

In this presentation we presented and discussed the capabilities of Serbian Network of Excellence (NoE) in materials characterization that aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of materials characterization of engineering materials and their co-evolution with science, materials science, industry and society.

Proposed research framework in hydrogen embrittlement refers to the challenges and most obvious problems of how to link models, phenomenology and morphology of different materials failures of industrial components at different scales and how to successful translate the insights gained into outcomes of practical value to the engineering community.

Downloadable Presentation is available at:

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Serbian Network of Excellence (NoE) in materials characterization

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Serbian Network of Excellence (NoE) in Materials Characterization Team is composed of four renowned research-scientific institutions:

  1. University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Engineering Materials and Welding and Laboratory for Machine Elements and Systems Testing
  2. University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Science, Materials Science Laboratory
  3. Military Technical Institute (MTI), Structural and technical materials laboratory
  4. University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics Belgrade

We are looking for partnerships in Research Project and formation of an excellent consortium consisting of complementary partners that will help us to retain our competitive edge in materials characterization and hydrogen embrittlement reasearch over the long term.

Serbian Network of Excellence (NoE) in Materials Characterization,

Coordinator and contact person: Milos Djukic,(mdjukic@mas.bg.ac.rs)

Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, 

University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,

Department of Engineering Materials and Welding.


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

https://milosdjukichydrogen.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/network21.jpg

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of hydrogen degradation of engineering materials and their co-evolution with science, materials science, industry and society, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

 

Research Project HIPP on Hydrogen-induced degradation of steels – NTNU, Norway

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Hydrogen-induced degradation of offshore steels in ageing infrastructure – models for prevention and prediction (HIPP)


Project lead: Professor Zhiliang Zhang, Norwegian University of Science and Technology -NTNU, Department of Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology, NTNU Nanomechanical Lab, Norway

For more information about the project, see the project webpage

The primary objective of HIPP Project is to develop a model framework which describes and couples environment-assisted hydrogen degradation mechanisms at different length and time scales towards a predictive mechanism-based integrity assessment approach for oil and gas steel infrastructure.

Project Duration: 2014-2018, Funding: The Research Council of Norway, PETROMAKS2 Program

Structure of the HIPP project – from HIPP Project website (https://www.ntnu.edu/kt/research/hipp)

hipp-structure

This project attacks the challenge by linking modelling of fundamental mechanisms on different scales. On the basis of existing knowledge and expertise on atomistic simulations, embrittlement mechanisms and fracture mechanics assessment, this project will provide a scientific platform for an integrated model that can assess hydrogen induced failures in offshore steel structures.

The project team consists of three complementary groups (NTNU Nanomechanical Lab, SINTEF Materials and Nanotechnology, and University of Oslo), of skilled and experienced scientists that join their efforts in order to realize a mechanism-based integrity assessment approach.

Project partners

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SINTEF


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Project Members:

  1. Professor Zhiliang Zhang, NTNU, Project leader
  2. Professor Afrooz Barnoush, NTNU
  3. Dr. Vigdis Olden, SINTEF
  4. Dr. Antonio Alvaro, SINTEF
  5. Dr. Ingvild Julie Thue Jensen, SINTEF
  6. Prof. Ole Martin Løvvik, SINTEF
  7. Inga Gudem Ringdalen
    Research Scientist and PhD co-supervisor
  8. Dr. Annett Thøgersen, SINTEF
  9. Dr. Amin Shahrestani Azar, SINTEF
  10. Dr. Nousha Kheradmand, NTNU
  11. Tarlan Hajilou, NTNU
  12. Kai Zhao, NTNU
  13. Domas Birenis, UIO

HIPP Project publications:

  1. An invited presentation was given by HIPP scientist International Hydrogen Energy Development Forum 2015, Kyushu University, Japan, February 3-4: A. Alvaro, I. Thue Jensen, N. Kheradmand , A. Barnoush, O. M. Løvvik,  V. Olden, A multiscale approach to interface degradation by hydrogen
  2. PhD student Kai Zhao gave an oral presentation at the EUROMAT 2015 on Growth and Coalescence of Nanoided Iron.
  3. PhD student Domas Birenis gave a poster presentation on Atomic Level Study of Hydrogen-Induced Degradation on Offshore Steels at EUROMAT 2015.
  4. A. Alvaro, I. Thue Jensen, N. Kheradmand, O. M. Løvvik, V. Olden, Hydrogen Embrittlement in Nickel, Visited by First Principles Modeling, Cohesive Zone Simulation and Nanomechanical Testing, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 40 (2015) 16892–1690
  5. Haiyang Yu, Jim Stian Olsen, Antonio Alvaro, Vigdis Olden, Jianying He, Zhiliang Zhang. A uniform hydrogen degradation law for high strength steels. Engineering Fracture Mechanics 157, (2016) 56–71

Photo – Structure of the HIPP project: NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology all rights reserved © 2014

All pictures, text and logos in this post, Copyrights by NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, SINTEF amd University of Oslo all rights reserved © 2016


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

https://milosdjukichydrogen.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/network21.jpg

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of hydrogen degradation of engineering materials and their co-evolution with science, materials science, industry and society, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

What makes a materials scientist tickle?

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By Claudio Schoen, Associate Professor at the University of São Paulo about Non-linear thinking. Research area – Materials Science (general), Materials Mechanics and Computational Thermodynamics.

cgschoen

Back in year 1996 Walter Schütz, in his work “A history of fatigue” told the history on how Gassner in 1941, measuring the fatigue strength of high strength aluminum alloys of the series 7XXX (Al-Zn-Mg), and finding this was not much different from the lower strength, lower cost, alloys of series 2XXX (Al – Cu), warned that if they were used, for example, to build an airplane, this would lead to premature fatigue failures.

This argument is tricky and seems illogical. Aren’t the alloys of series 7XXX of higher strength compared to alloys 2XXX? And didn’t Gassner find out the fatigue strength was about the same? So why would the fatigue live be smaller if the 7XXX alloys were used?

The explanation for this apparent contradiction is simple. The only possible reason to use a higher strength alloy (especially when it is more expensive) in place of…

View original post 384 more words

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention, and Models

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Paper:

Milos B. Djukic, Gordana M. Bakic, Vera Sijacki Zeravcic, Aleksandar Sedmak, and Bratislav Rajicic, Hydrogen Embrittlement of Industrial Components: Prediction, Prevention and Models. CORROSION. 2016; 72(7): 943-961., http://dx.doi.org/10.5006/1958

on

LES EXPERTS ANALYSE DEFAILLANCES

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LES EXPERTS ANALYSE DEFAILLANCES

2016-07-05_17h26_56

A paper find on ResearchGate and published in “Corrosion-Houston_Texas “- July 2016.

This paper gives an overview of the application of a model for structural integrity analysis of boiler tubes made of plain carbon steel exposed during operation to a local corrosion process and multiple hydrogen assisted degradation processes: hydrogen embrittlement and high-temperature hydrogen attack. The model is based on the correlation of mechanical properties to scanning electron microscopy fractography analysis of fracture surfaces in the presence of simultaneously active hydrogen embrittlement micro-mechanisms. The proposed model is practical for use as a predictive maintenance in power plants, as it is based on the use of standard macro-mechanical tests.

Read more

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