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Materials and Corrosion Trends in Offshore and Subsea Oil and Gas Production

For more information about the project, see the project webpage.

Project on Open Science Framework (OSF) by:

  1. Mariano Iannuzzi, Adjunct Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Principal Engineer, General Electric – Oil & Gas
  2. Afrooz BarnoushProfessor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
  3. Roy JohnsenProfessor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Norwegian University of Science and Technology -NTNU

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

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Project description: The ever-growing energy demand requires the exploration and the safe, profitable exploitation of unconventional reserves. The extreme environments of some of these unique prospects challenge the boundaries of traditional engineering alloys as well as our understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms that could lead to a failure. Despite their complexity, high-pressure and high-temperature, deep- and ultra-deep, pre-salt, and Arctic reservoirs represent the most important source of innovation regarding materials technology, design methodologies, and corrosion control strategies.

Here is a preprint of the latest manuscript by Mariano IannuzziAfrooz Barnoush and Roy Johnsen, which is currently accepted for publication and in press in the upcoming Nature Materials Degradation journal:

Iannuzzi, Mariano, Afrooz Barnoush, and Roy Johnsen. 2017. “Materials and Corrosion Trends in Offshore and Subsea Oil and Gas Production”. engrXiv. April 28. osf.io/preprints/engrxiv/qj65n.

NTNU logo in this post, Copyrights by NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, all rights reserved © 2017


This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

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The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific understanding of hydrogen degradation of engineering materials and their co-evolution with science, materials science, industry and society, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

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Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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