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Great open access review article by

  • Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi (Curtin University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Australia),
  • Prof. Afrooz Barnoush (Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norway) and
  • Prof. Roy Johnsen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norway)

in npj Materials Degradation about corrosion and materials challenges in offshore and subsea oil and gas production.

M. Iannuzzi, A. Barnoush, R. Johnsen, Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production, npj Materials Degradation, 1 (2017) 1-11. doi: 10.1038/s41529–017–0003–4

oil-and-gas-industry

Abstract

The ever-growing energy demand requires the exploration and the safe, profitable exploitation of unconventional reserves. The extreme environments of some of these unique prospects challenge the boundaries of traditional engineering alloys, as well as our understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms that could lead to a failure. Despite their complexity, high-pressure and high-temperature, deep and ultra-deep, pre-salt, and Arctic reservoirs represent the most important source of innovation regarding materials technology, design methodologies, and corrosion control strategies. This paper provides an overview of trends in materials and corrosion research and development, with focus on subsea production but applicable to the entire industry. Emphasis is given to environmentally assisted cracking of high strength alloys and advanced characterization techniques based on in situ electrochemical nanoindentation and cantilever bending testing for the study of microstructure-environment interactions.

For more details about this review article please check post titled:

Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production – Publication

on About Corrosion blog by Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi.


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Microcantilever geometry and dimensions – Fig 7 from M. Iannuzzi, A. Barnoush, R. Johnsen, Materials and corrosion trends in offshore and subsea oil and gas production, npj Materials Degradation, 1 (2017) 1-11. doi: 10.1038/s41529–017–0003–4

The article has been published as OpenAccess, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

About Corrosion blog by Prof. Mariano Iannuzzi.

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This post is a part of:

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement

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The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement aims to strengthen scientific and technological excellence by developing an integrated and interdisciplinary scientific approach, and also by addressing the fragmentation of European and Worldwide research in this area.

The Network of Excellence in Hydrogen Embrittlement is structured so that it consists of the following branches:

  1. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on LinkedIn
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement  – Understanding and research framework Project
    on ResearchGate
  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement Group on Mendeley
  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Materials Science Blog on WordPress
  5. Research Topic titled “Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanisms” (closed now) in collaboration with Frontiers in Materials Journal within Corrosion Research section
  6. Damage and Fracture Mechanism Group on LinkedIn

The Network of Excellence (NoE) in Hydrogen Embrittlement logo, Copyrights by Milos Djukic all rights reserved © 2013, 2014

Hydrogen Embrittlement & Materials Science by Milos Djukic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

 

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